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Reviews
October 22nd, 2016

REVIEW – The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth J. Church

the atomic weight of love

The Atomic Weight of Love follows Meridian, an intelligent and brilliant young woman, from the age of seventeen when she’s starting university in 1941, to the present day when she’s in her eighties.

While at university she falls in love with an older man, Alden, an intelligent but mysterious professor. They end up getting married and she follows him to Los Alamos where he’s working on a secret project (which we later find out is the atomic bomb). For him she gives up her hopes of studying for a PhD and of furthering her career in ornithology (the study of birds).

We follow our main character through the decades as she makes and loses friends, falls into temptation with a younger man and deals with the changing roles and increasing power of being a woman.

This novel is many things – it definitely has a feminist slant as Meridian promotes this throughout her story. At the end of the book we learn what she is up to in her later years and it really is fantastic.

It’s also a very erotic novel in parts, as we’re with her as she discovers the power and freedom of sex and truly explores it for the first time. Continue Reading

Reviews
July 14th, 2016

REVIEW – Fermat’s Last Theorem by Simon Singh

Fermat's Last Theorem book review

Originally published in 1997, Fermat’s Last Theorem by Simon Singh has been on my TBR list for a while. I picked it up last week while visiting a glorious second hand bookshop in Edinburgh (thank you Armchair Books!).

I love a good popular science book and this is probably the first ‘popular maths’ book I’ve read. It’s absolutely accessible for readers with little or no mathematical knowledge – there’s a reason this book hit the bestseller list when it was released.

Synopsis from Goodreads:

xn + yn = zn, where n represents 3, 4, 5, …no solution

“I have discovered a truly marvelous demonstration of this proposition which this margin is too narrow to contain.”

With these words, the seventeenth-century French mathematician Pierre de Fermat threw down the gauntlet to future generations. What came to be known as Fermat’s Last Theorem looked simple; proving it, however, became the Holy Grail of mathematics, baffling its finest minds for more than 350 years. In Fermat’s Enigma–based on the author’s award-winning documentary film, which aired on PBS’s “Nova”–Simon Singh tells the astonishingly entertaining story of the pursuit of that grail, and the lives that were devoted to, sacrificed for, and saved by it. Here is a mesmerizing tale of heartbreak and mastery that will forever change your feelings about mathematics.

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